Black Flash is an extremely popular flash/cure unit in the screen print industry. There is not a single easy answer. Typically a flash dryer is placed 2-3 inches above the screen printing platen height. It is very important to know how to cure properly while working on prints using any type of inks while printing on any textile. Insert your infrared bulbs into their sockets. Fusion bond makes the ink behave as if it has a catalyst, yet does not have one and stays soft. Vastex Econored dryer (infrared) settings to cure plastisol ink. Complete 3 to 5 wash cycles and compare the "washed" sample to the "unwashed" sample. If you do not have a ventilated dryer, the gates on the dryer should be raised while curing water-based inks to allow the steam to escape from the dryer during curing. This causes plastisol ink dye migration problems. Flick them on and wait five minutes. Holes spaced evenly across the infrared heater face create a remarkably level spread of air. Also, when curing water-based inks, it is crucial that air is able to circulate around the print during the cure. Wearing gloves, slide your freshly screenprinted T-shirt under the box on stilts until the temperature reaches 320 degrees Fahrenheit (for plastisol ink) to be partially cured. Recording those temperatures at say, five second intervals, will give you a good profile on how well your dryer is working. Plastisol ink will not dry, or cure, at normal temperatures. Can I somehow cure the plastisol ink properly with just a flash dryer? To cure plastisol inks, (screen printing inks) the printed fabric is run through a conveyor gas dryer which can cause sublimation of the garments dye. Use an infrared temperature gun … If air can’t circulate around the print, that steam becomes trapped and prevents the remaining water from evaporating out of the ink. Are you using an electric dryer or a gas dryer? 2. Ryonet's in-house expert Colin Huggins goes in-depth about how to properly cure plastisol Plastisol inks will never dry even when exposed to air until they are cured with heat. As with any ink, proper curing involves following the ink manufacturer’s recommendations. Are you printing on T-shirts or fleece? Broad curing range profile Cure inks from 270°F (132°C) to 320°F (160°C) depending upon curing conveyor dryer settings and fabrics, to provide flexibility to manage print operations. First, be sure that you are not applying too much ink to your substrates. Our great sale team is here to help whether you are a large shop or just starting up. Buckets of Ink offers great prices on screen printing supplies and embroidery supplies every day. They should be "flashed" when printing in sequence. Your email address will not be published. Let’s talk about finding the right solutions for you! Union Ink™ Low-Cure Plastisol Inks Flexible cure opaque inks that prevent heat-related defects With the continued growth of polyester and blended fabrics, screen printers face many challenges choosing the right inks to print— including overcoming dye migration and getting a softer hand of the print. Keep in mind that thicker ink deposits (e.g., High Density) take more time to reach their specified cure/fusion temperatures. With normal ink coverage, when the ink begins to smoke just a little bit, it will be cured. God Bless. Using a flash dryer for flashing. Our large inventory of plastisol inks, PMI screen tape, waterproof films, emulsions, reclaiming screen chemicals, screen cleaners, and screen print tools is always in-stock and ready for delivery. When flash curing plastisol screen printing inks, you want to gel the top layer sufficiently to apply a second color or layer. Glitters generally require a 60 mesh count, while metallics require 110 mesh counts. This prevents the high heat needed to melt plastisol inks from melting, shrinking or burning nylon, polyester, Dazzle cloth, Spandex and other heat-sensitive fabrics. There are 3 factors that affect the "gel" or "flash" of the ink: the temperature of the flash, the distance of the flash from the printed image, and the time the printed image is exposed to the heat. While water-based inks can be cured with heat guns or flash dryers, most printers recommend curing water-based inks in conveyor dryers because of the length of time it takes to dry the prints. Take a sample print, cut it in half, and wash it 3 to 5 times in a conventional washing machine with 3 pairs of jeans or towels. The short answer is when the entire ink film thickness reaches its specified cure/fusion temperature. Plastisol ink has to reach a temperature of 320 to 330 degrees Fahrenheit so that it … Dwell time is dependent on the spot dryer used. You also might flash an ink to keep wet ink off the back of your screens. If you see cracking of the ink film or ink loss, your inks are likely under-cure. Check your flash cure unit to see if it has temperature and airflow controls. The infrared heat penetrates the ink and fuses the PVC resins and other ingredients. How to Dry Water-Based and Plastisol Inks Easily Save money, energy and space by using a single conveyor dryer system. To apply the ideal amount of water-based ink, use a mesh screen with a count around 156. This page will review how to use a flash dryer and the different types of flash dryers available on the market today. You can use your flash unit to cure your inkbut we do not recommend it. The difference between plastisol ink and water-based ink is especially evident when it comes to curing. The other problem is the dwell, or the amount of time that the shirt has to stay under the flash. Any tips on doing so if this is possible? 3801 Foil Adhesive will spot dry, with a very low after flash tack. So, test, test, and test again before using the black in production. Some inks, such as glitters, metallics and high densities, are not designed to be printed "wet-on wet". Consistent radiant heat over the entire element surface ensures every print is consistently cured. A blower in the rear of the dryer p Excess water-based ink doesn’t serve to make your prints any bolder because there is only so much ink that the fibers of your substrate will hold. You may use meshes between 60 and 110 for optimal coverage. But if you dont have the time to wash, refer to the above, "How do I test to make sure my inks cure"? The dyes Use light to medium pressure. The Air-Flash™ Cure Station from Vastex combines infrared heating with forced air to heat the ink while cooling the garment. You also will want to perform a wash test of a trial print to be sure that your water-based ink has been properly cured. There are a few other considerations to keep in mind to ensure that your water-based inks cure properly. Flash dryers get the job done, but there are some tips and tricks to ensuring your print becomes completely cured. A flash cure is a simple infrared heater on a stand. Flashing enables you to print one coat of ink on top of another - e.g., a color on a white base. Set the Dryer for 'Cotton/High' and dry for 30 minutes. Most inks will "gel" (flash) when the ink film reaches 220F to 230F (104C to 110C). Copyright © 2018-2021 Anatol Equipment Manufacturing Co. All Rights Reserved. ?The results are surprising. Built to last, the Black Flash is ready to be your all-purpose dryer for years to come. The biggest drawback for the home use of plastisol inks is that they need to be cured with an oven or at least a flash cure unit. A combined infrared and pass-through air dryer, the Air Flash Dryer by BBC Industries, Inc. is ideal for flashing or curing water-based or plastisol inks. Plastisol inks will never dry even when exposed to air until they are cured with heat. You’ll want to reach a cure temperature of 300 to 320 degree for the 2 to 3 minutes required for curing water-based ink, so set the conveyor dryer to a temperature between 550 and 600 degrees and lower the belt speed. To cure water based inks you may need infrared radiant heat as well as air flow to get the moisture out and cure the pigments. Typical problems that arise from improperly cured inks include: ink washing off the garments, cracking of the ink film, loss of color, and bleeding of the garment color(s) into the ink film. With plastisol inks, curing only requires bringing the ink to the manufacturer’s recommended temperature for a few seconds, which allows the PVC particles and the plasticizer in the ink to bond together and hold tightly to your substrate. It'll show you the ink temp all over the shirt, and once the lowest temp reads 330F, you're good to go. Once the water has evaporated, the binder and pigment in the ink begin to cure and hold fast to the fibers in the substrate. However, when it comes to curing plastisol ink, it is essential to keep in mind a few things, failing which the print tends to come off after the first wash itself, the color starts fading and the ink begins to crack. 5. They must be exposed at a temperature around 300 - 330º F (143-166º C) to be properly cured (dried). Watch the shirt carefully the first few times. Complete 3 to 5 wash cycles and compare the "washed" sample to the "unwashed" sample. If your garments pass the wash test, then you definitely know your ink is cure properly. And third, a "Thermo-Probe" can be placed in the "wet" ink film or on the garment to measure real-time temperatures as it passes through the dryer. That temperature is provided on your specific ink's product bulletin. In some cases, you may have to lower the heat of the spot cure unit because too much heat may actually make the ink tacky. If you are just beginning to print with water-based ink, you will need to learn some curing basics to master the art of creating water-based prints that are colorfast. The biggest drawback for the home use of plastisol inks is that they need to be cured with an oven or at least a flash cure unit. Directly after printing, garments are placed in a conveyor dryer containing infrared heat panels. Looking for the right dryer to handle all of your curing requirements? Place a teflon sheet on the print. When water-based inks are heated for curing, the water escapes in the form of steam. Set the washer for 'Hot Wash/Cold Rinse'. Types of fleece: advantages & disadvantages, How to Use Post-Exposure to Create Durable Screen Printing Stencils, For service request related information, please contact our. Plastisol ink can be printed on many items that can withstand the heat required to cure the ink and is porous enough to permit good ink adhesion. Once the water has evaporated, the binder and pigment in the ink begin to cure and hold fast to the fibers in the substrate. If you are screen printing on garments then chances are you will be using plastisol ink which requires a temperature of 325 F. to cure. These can help you better control your flash cure process. The colors will remain wet (will not dry) unless cured at the recommended temperature, preferably with a flash cure, or conveyor dryer. These inks are very soft, and easy to print through a range of mesh counts. Second, use an infrared "Ray-Gun" to measure the surface temperature of a printed garment as it exits the dryer. Adding too much pigment can upset the chemistry and render the newly-made black ink impossible to cure. As with any ink, p… Remember that it is important that the entire ink film thickness reach the specified cure/fusion temperature. Infrared heat is used primarily for drying and curing PVC resin, or plastisol, inks used in the printing of wearable goods. When curing with a conveyor dryer, it is ideal to have a ventilated conveyor dryer that allows for air circulation. Set the washer for 'Hot Wash/Cold Rinse'. A "Wash Test" is the best method. There are several reasons. This powerful dryer uses forced air. Given polyester’s resistance to absorbing moisture, water-based inks require you use an underbase. Required fields are marked *. The tape will indicate the peak temperature of the garment within the dryer. Your email address will not be published. The most important part of finishing a screen-printing job is to dry or cure the ink or liquids that created your customer’s signature artwork or promotional message properly without damaging the garment. 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